Submissions - Individual workers via VTHC

Glenn Richmond, Epping (received via VTHC)

Labour hire even though they had us doing security roles 
employed through a labour hire agency by Unlimited recruitment @ The Epping market and my agency was Unlimited recruitment

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Try and get enough votes through the Senate to make labour hire companies accountable and abolish the payment of subsidies to labour hire companies for putting workers on their books. There are labour hire agencies that call you in for interviews you give them your bank details, personal details, sit aptitude tests then don't ring you. It's a rort. They even have jobs advertised that are no longer available up on their websites for up to month after the job is gone.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency less than a year ago. Unlimited Workforce Labour Hire agency had us working at the market in Epping, as labour hire. We were doing security work there with no formal training. I brought this up with my boss and the next day at the opening of the market. I didn't have a job and they wouldn't even give me a reason. I asked have I been sacked they said no we will ring when some work comes up. That was 5 months ago now they also told me that we don't have to give you a reason as you are labour hire? One day some worker is going to go a rampage on grounds of some agency just brushing them off and not showing any compassion. You have to understand that people are getting let go on the grounds of their personalities, what they look like and no one is there to listen. If you mentioned anything about safety and it's taken out of context or it looks like you are making them look silly/stupid then they can just ring you and say there is no more work for you and we will ring when something comes up we are not sacking you. They can't even be honest with you and say we have no intention of ringing you for work.

After training people at the new Epping Market and being told that there would be full time job down the track I was keen as mustard to start as I had years of experience in car parks opening new ones closing them etc. One day at work I mentioned to one of the security guards wouldn't it be easier if we could drive one of the mobile buggies around so we can familiarise ourselves with the market because we were only getting one day a week there until the opening of it. I was told the bosses didn't want us to drive them on the opening day. I rocked up for my shift only to be see my name crossed out and told in front of everyone that there is no more work here for me? To make matters worse my Centrelink provider didn't want to pass any more jobs on for me as they were told I was a trouble maker.

I'm still unemployed! I lost my house and now have a bad credit rating and cannot rent another house I still have suicidal thoughts because my young daughter has since moved to her alcoholic mother's house where she lives with an abusive boyfriend. This happened at the Epping Market and my agency was Unlimited Recruitment, Epping when I was employed by Unlimited Recruitment. This happened in the Labour hire even though they had us doing security roles industry. Try and get enough votes through the Senate to make labour hire companies accountable and abolish the payment of subsidies to labour hire companies for putting workers on their books there is labour hire agency that call you in for interviews you give them your bank details, personal details, sit aptitude tests then don't ring you. It's a rort. They even have jobs advertised that are no longer available up on their websites for up to month after the job is gone.


Anonymous, Echuca (HSU received via VTHC) 

Disability
A directly employed casual by DDHS @ DDHS

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Having positions that, although casual, have some of the benefits of permanent position like sick leave, long service, holiday etc. for no casual loading and directly related to the hours worked

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. Worrying when at the start of a week when there not many shifts if you had done something wrong. NDIS is a worry in the future. This happened at DDHS, Echuca when I was employed by DDHS. This happened in the disability industry. Having positions that although casual have some of the benefits of permanent position like sick leave, long service, holiday etc. for no casual loading and directly related to the hours worked


 

Anonymous, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Higher Education
A directly employed casual @ Deakin University, Swinburne University, Monash University, Verve Studios

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

See above

Story

I was a directly employed casual less than a year ago. See below.

Introduction
I am a 29 year-old professional film writer-director and former sessional academic tutor. I am passionate about education and have worked for six and a half years as a casual sessional tutor, primarily in film production, at various tertiary institutions. As a student, I took my education very seriously and worked very hard towards my goal of working as a professional filmmaker. I graduated year 12 with an ENTER score of 99.55 and won a full merit scholarship to undertake a Bachelor of Creative Arts at Melbourne University. I received the Dean's Award for academic excellence in my first year and graduated in 2008 with a high distinction average. Since graduating, I have pursued my creative practice as a writer-director, and have been perhaps the only person from my graduating year to make and release a feature film. Because of my academic success and creative practice and industry experience, I was able to get work as a sessional academic tutor in film production, acting and critical thinking at Melbourne University, Monash University, Deakin University, Swinburne University and a private acting college called Verve Studios. I supported myself between early 2009 and mid-2015 principally by working at these institutions. Throughout my teaching career, I have been praised consistently for the quality of my teaching and enthusiasm for the filmmaking craft and in 2014 I received a letter of commendation for excellence in teaching from Deakin University.

Despite my passion for education, I feel as though the tertiary system as it currently stands has let me down personally and is also not constructed to provide the best experience for students. I no longer work as a casual tutor and I would like to describe my experience with this form of insecure employment in the hope that the system could be improved. I have made some recommendations for constructive changes below. Throughout my experience, I enjoyed teaching very much and was grateful to have the friendship and support of my professional colleagues and supervisors. However, despite my love of teaching and friendship with the other staff, these jobs all caused significant stress on my personal life and relationships, primarily due to the uncertain, and what often feels to be unfair, nature of this kind of sessional work. I would like to make clear that my immediate supervisors were never anything but supportive personally, and to the best of my knowledge the issues I encountered are the result of systemic problems rather than any one individual's behaviour.

Low pay, lack of job security
On average, despite making myself fully available and requesting as much work as possible, I normally earned around $30,000 per year before tax as a sessional academic tutor. This is unfair given the skills, expertise and effort required, not to mention the level of responsibility and competitiveness, particularly academically, in getting such a job. The take home pay is low because:

  • Academic tutors are only paid by the hour for the classes taught and a set number of hours preparation time. As there are only one or two classes timetabled per day, it is rare to receive a full day's pay.
  • Academic tutors are required to be widely available but each unit only has one or two classes per week and these could be on any day of the week and clash with other teaching times;
  • Less than 65% of the year contains teaching weeks due to extended university holidays, study weeks and exam times, during which there are no classes and no work apart from limited marking.

The relationship also always felt very one-way. There is essentially no job security at all for sessional teachers. Even if I taught six classes in one semester, there was no guarantee that I would get a similar number, or any at all, the following semester. What I describe here is also not unique to me. The other sessional tutors I know have also reported very similar experiences and all of the institutions I worked for use significant numbers of casual teaching staff. Casual teaching staff are no longer used merely to conduct peripheral tutorials that are ancillary to the main lectures or used on an ad hoc or short-term lecturing basis. Casual tutors like me are performing core teaching functions and assuming many of the responsibilities formerly held by permanent academic lecturers but without any ongoing commitment from the university and with much less take home pay and far inferior conditions.

In all of the units I taught, I taught alone and in many instances I was the sole lecturer for the unit. In those units I would work under the direction of an administrative co-ordinator but I was the sole teacher and point of contact for the students. In other units, I would perform the same duties as permanent lecturers who also had their own class groups in those subjects. I taught not only undergraduate units but masters-level units also. The other teachers and I would normally only find out what kind of workload we could expect a week or two before the start of semester. There were even cases of workloads being shifted during the first week of semester as either more students enrolled or transferred to other subjects. It is practically impossible to plan one's life with any kind of confidence when you're not sure if you are going to have an income in a few weeks. The amount of teaching work available was set entirely by student and administrative priorities and academic tutors' needs were not considered. The work is made to depend on student enrolment numbers which fluctuate from semester to semester in accordance with degree enrolment numbers and students' current (and often changing and last-minute) choices about which subjects to undertake each semester. Academic tutors have no ability to influence the number of classes offered or the timetabling of class times. Their only ability to set their own hours of work is to refuse work. It is entirely a one-way process.

By way of illustration, at Deakin University in 2014, I earned $122.40 per 1-hour class which includes 1 hour of teaching time and two hours paid preparation time. If I only conduct one tutorial per day, then $122.40 is all I receive that day before tax, an amount further reduced by travel costs. Throughout my time as a university teacher, it was not unusual to be only scheduled for three, or even only two hours of classes on a day. It was also rare to be able to work every day due to timetable clashes. On average I would probably only be given two or three days of teaching per week, each of those with only a few hours' worth of classes. The rate of pay however is further reduced if the class is a repeat lecture that week. The rate drops to $81.60 including 1 hour of teaching and two hours preparation time. Marking is paid at $56.88 per hour and typically allocated at only 1 hour per student for all coursework for the unit, which is not nearly enough to do the job properly (essentially this puts pressure on the teachers to do unpaid work in order to actually provide the students with any kind of useful feedback). If a class was full this would add 30 hours' work per unit, but this is reduced according to student numbers. Any further administration time such as reading the not insignificant volume of staff emails, including notices, administrative changes, safety messages and so forth that all university staff are expected to keep abreast of is unpaid. I found, in practice by maintaining multiple jobs with multiple universities, the most I could expect to work if there were no cancellations was 8 teaching hours per week (during teaching weeks), with on average 4 of these being repeat tutorials.

Some universities are on a trimester system and some are on a semester system, hence their teaching-free weeks are different, meaning in a non-teaching week in one university I might still have a few hours' work in another university, making it difficult to try and supplement non-teaching weeks with freelance work. As you can imagine, it is extremely time consuming and stressful trying to balance different employer's timetables and requirements to try and get sufficient hours. This means I could at best earn approximately $30,000 per annum before tax from teaching work with no paid holidays or paid sick leave, despite having to be available full-time in order to achieve this and the disruption to my life being equivalent to that of a full time job except for an essentially extended unpaid holiday twice per year during university vacation. For simplification, the pay estimate calculations below are based on Deakin University's pay rate and its trimester system of 11 teaching weeks per trimester. My tutorials varied from 1 to 3 hours per institution. The most I was ever offered was 12 hours teaching per week at one institution but that was very rare, for most of the last semester I worked I only had 5 1-hour tutorials of teaching per week total. The below is only a best case scenario estimate of the most it was possible for me to earn in any of the last three years: Calculations – annual earnings Tutorials: 4 tutorials x $122.40 x 11 weeks x 3 trimesters = $16,156.80 Repeat tutorials: 4 tutorials x $81.60 x 11 weeks x 3 trimesters = $10,771.20 Marking: 20 students x $56.88 (assuming 20 students) x 2 courses x 3 trimesters = $6,825.60 Total gross annual earnings: $33,753.60. In practice, my earnings were less than this due to student and course cancellations and some years I earned less than $30,000 per annum before tax.

To make things clear, I want to emphasise that I was not just a temporary tutor covering someone else. In some instances I was the sole tutor/lecturer teaching the entire unit. So despite my lack of job security my level of responsibility was often very high and I did this work for a long time - over 6 years at three of the universities. There was also no clear path of how to achieve greater job security. The tried and true method would be to do a PhD and hope to receive a permanent position, but even with that there are no guarantees. I was a professional tutor with a combination of academic and practical expertise but I knew of other tutors in more purely academic roles with PhDs working casually for years without prospects of permanent work.

The lack of job security also had the following impact on me:

  • It was difficult to plan ahead for other job opportunities, holidays, and social engagements.
  • Disruption of my artistic practice due to varying hours of work.
  • Varying income from semester to semester. Without a partner, I would not have felt confident about being able to afford rent and bills.
  • Added relationship stress.

Permanent lecturers were often sympathetic or ashamed of the inferior conditions I experienced. One supervising lecturer in particular made great efforts to try and get me some of the access to equipment that permanent staff enjoyed but this proved too difficult as resources were constrained to the use of permanent staff. It was clear sessional staff were not considered full participants in the community of teaching staff. A sympathetic supervisor pushed against some resistance for myself and a colleague to be included in a week-long training course conducted in house in new editing software the university was rolling out. He was unsuccessful in getting approval for us to be paid for the training despite the skills being required for all teachers but he managed to get the fees for the course materials covered. When we told him we could not afford to attend for a week without pay, we were told that this could prevent us from getting further teaching work as other tutors with those skills would be "more competitive" so in the end we attended. He was sympathetic and regretted the university's policy but it was beyond his authority to do anything about it. Paid training is not provided to casual staff even when it is essential for their job and even if they are long-standing employees.

Issues getting paid

Even within a semester, where one should have a reliable number of work hours week to week, there were still issues. As far as I'm aware, full time or part time staff members get paid automatically each fortnight. However, sessional staff members are required to submit timesheets. For my first few years at Monash, this was done on a physical piece of paper but since then all the places I've worked at have transitioned to electronic systems. Getting timesheets approved can be problematic in organisations as large and chaotic as universities. In my time as a teacher I have encountered several instances where a supervisor was not available to approve my timesheet and I was not paid until the following fortnight. This is a significant stress when you are already a low income earner and have rent and bills to pay. There was one instance where my direct supervisor was away when a timesheet should have been approved, and I did not have enough money in the bank to pay my rent. I had to appeal to someone high up in the department to help me get paid outside of the normal pay cycle, and was made to feel quite guilty and that it would cost the department extra money. They didn't force me to just wait – I was paid, however, I certainly felt chastised, despite the circumstances being completely out of my control, and did not want to ever do it again as I did not want to jeopardise my job. Another memorable instance was also at Monash University where a new teacher joined the subject I taught and was not paid for approximately ten weeks. There were excuses made about issues with HR and getting contracts approved. I don't understand how any excuse can be given for a situation like this and that it can be legal to pay staff so late.

Unfairness in hiring practices and job security

This brings me to the part of my experience I find most heart-breaking. I pride myself on being an excellent teacher. I work extremely hard and each semester my evaluations show that the majority of my students think I am doing a great job. All of my supervisors have commended my efforts. The letter of commendation I received from Deakin University stated: "I am writing to you on behalf of the School of Communication and Creative Arts to thank you for your excellent teaching in Trimester One, 2014. Your outstanding result recognises the commitment and support you provide to your students. Excellence in teaching is highly valued by the University and makes an important contribution to the development of able graduates as well as enhancing the experience of all students during their time at Deakin. The School appreciates your dedication and effort with thanks." My student evaluations around this time were also glowing. Here is one student's comment: "[The tutor] not only made an effort in class to actively engage all the students but outside of class he was incredibly helpful as well. I was unhappy with one of the project report sheets that we were required to complete for this unit and found it to be stifling and unnecessary, [the tutor] not only went well out of his way to explain to me the benefits of it but also drew from his own experiences to inspire me to complete it and continue working on the project. This was unexpected and incredibly appreciated. I would not have learnt anywhere near as much as I did from this unit if it wasn't for his extra efforts. Don't lose this one." However, shortly after receiving the letter of commendation from Deakin University, I was told there were no classes available for me to teach in 2015, directly contradicting the sentiments in their earlier letter that excellence in teaching was highly valued and my dedication was appreciated.

My supervisor explained that "they" wanted tenured staff to take on more teaching hours and that unfortunately there were less hours available for sessionals. I never got to find out exactly who "they" were. Luckily I was still offered five hours of teaching at Swinburne in the first semester of 2015. Again, I did my best and the students and my supervisor seemed to genuinely appreciate what I brought to the course. However, again I faced the same fate. A few weeks before the end of first semester my supervisor called me to say that unfortunately he could only offer me one hour of teaching per week in semester two. Again, "they" wanted the tenured staff to take more teaching hours, so as a sessional I was out. I had to decline as one hour's work per week is simply not viable.

The employment of permanent staff did not appear to be meritocratic. From what I can tell, the default hiring practice of permanent teachers at universities seems to favour recent PhD grads or PhD students within the department. From what I've personally witnessed there does not seem to be any real requirement that those graduates actually have any teaching ability, it is merely the case often that they happen to be already known in the department and have the potential to at the same time do more research in the university's name. I witnessed several PhD students that were hired and were not competent teachers. In my first few years at Monash University, it pains me to state publicly that students would routinely move from other classes to my class as they reported another tutor was "completely useless". Another tutor was let go (I never found out if he was officially fired or not, but his classes were taken over) and after teaching it for the majority of the semester it was discovered that he had no idea what he was teaching. In some cases he was actually teaching the exact opposite of the correct answer. It concerned me that his teaching was not evaluated in the first two or three weeks of semester and the problem was identified so late. I have also witnessed similar problems in the teaching competence of some tenured staff members. Again, as far as I can tell, there doesn't seem to be adequate checks and balances for tenured lecturers' teaching skills. Hence, quality teaching can fail to be rewarded with job security and underperformance can be shielded by academic tenure.

After six and a half years of giving my all to university education I was, and still am, heartbroken. It was also morally problematic to continue teaching, knowing the lack of secure job opportunities and poor conditions ahead in that discipline for my students, most of whom I'm sure are paying large fees in the expectation that better career opportunities exist in those disciplines than in fact is the case. When I bump into my former students they usually ask me why I'm no longer teaching at Deakin and Swinburne. It is difficult to know what to tell them. All I can do is tell them I've moved onto other things and, hiding my concerns, wish them all the best with their own careers.

Recommendations

I recommend that:

  • Greater measures be taken to ensure that sessional academic tutors enjoy the same conditions as permanent staff;
  • Sessional academic tutors be consulted and their needs considered in course planning and timetabling;
  • In accordance with the above, sessional academic tutors be paid a per-day rate. This would put the onus on the university to try and put multiple teaching hours into one day, rather than make casual staff pay for the gaps. It would make this employment more viable, especially considering travel costs.
  • Sessional academic tutors be offered permanent employment after a set period of teaching;
  • There be greater monitoring, support and reward for quality teaching. In applied arts like film production this may mean acknowledging the importance of teaching skills and the contribution of industry professionals or other engaging teachers alongside research staff and supporting industry professionals and good teachers with permanent part-time employment.

See above This happened at Deakin University, Swinburne University, Monash University, Verve Studios, Melbourne when I was employed by As above. This happened in the Higher Education industry. See above


Anonymous, Melbourne (VTHC received via VTHC)

Disability Sector

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: true

Solution

If I was PM... I would look at the fundamentals. To me the fundamental principle of a wage is that it should reflect a person's contribution to society. I do not begrudge anyone their wage, however, I am deeply concerned by the level of disparity that is becoming entrenched in Australian society. Inequality is to me like a cancer that will erode our good will, respect and empathy towards each other. The Australian dream was best when it was shared by most and better still if it were shared by all. I believe that increasing wage disparity corresponds to increasing inequality of opportunity and that this is eroding our collective will to make this country great. Thus again if I were the PM, I would take a long hard look at the relationship between prescribed income and the real value of an individual's role and their contribution to our society. I would seek to identify a fairer pay scale system that recognises the need to empower the majority and works to maintain a fairer society for all.

Story

I was in my current job. I am acting in a management role and in this role I work around 10-20 hours unpaid per week as this is what is required to stay on top of my workload. I do not believe that it would benefit me to ask for more admin time, as I am on a month to month contract and I perceive that if I do not work to defined time tables then they will find another to do this role. If I cannot do my admin in the assigned time then the question is "what can I do to better manage my time and the priorities of this role?" However, I believe that the available time to attend my duties and the admin requirements of my role in the disability sector is grossly insufficient and unrealistic. Roster is not predictable as I am a month to month contract since July (acting up for 2 years and similar fashion). Child care arrangements are not easy to arrange as when my services are no longer required I will need to work different hours. When I take leave at the end of my term acting up, I expect to be paid against my substantive position. I cannot take leave whilst acting up as I perceive that I will be replaced.


Anonymous (VTHC received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. Pay was not the problem. I have been employed for over 15 years and recently went on contract to fill a permanent worker's sick leave. I went on contract to save the hospital money as I was cheaper on contract rather than casual. The worker will return in a month. I was on contract for five months. Now management want to bring in a grad nurse and I will be no longer needed. In the past I have asked for contract hours and the answer was always that there is not enough work. There actually was enough work. Other members before me have gained permanent work. There have been no complaints about my practice. I am dedicated and capable.


Nicola Castleman, Balwyn (ASU received via VTHC)

Hospitality
a directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Vote Labor

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. I was paid whatever the boss argued was reasonable that day. The pay was cash in hand, and paid daily with no accompanying paperwork. He would actually tell me that he was paying me less or more based on how many mistakes I'd made that day. The chef smoked in the kitchen, the whole kitchen was filthy, the floor was slippery, glass was being hand-washed in the cooking area - the list goes on. It was really an unpleasant atmosphere which made you want to not be there. This happened in Balwyn in a popular cafe, but it may not be running anymore. I've not been back there in years.


Anonymous, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Construction
employed through a labour hire agency by howsitgoingmate @ Frank Victoria a $3,000,000 house site in Templestowe

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

They won't fix it without banning all these casual and labour hire agencies. There are very few workers' rights in Australia. No one cares. The government is run by rich men that have interests in these types of companies and the private education sector so nothing will change, it will only get worse

Story

I am employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. I travel 2 hours to work and back, was told I would be paid a travelling allowance but wasn't. No paperwork on commencement of work, working upwards of 40 hours a week for $1100 a fortnight. No training or protection gear provided. Not paid when rained out, not paid award rate. No payslips provided for months yet I repeatedly asked. When I did receive pay slips they were an invoice template with no mention of tax or super. Told I would have to do 3 months of probation before my pay would go up to $25 an hour but it didn't go up and still no tax withholding paperwork for me to fill out. No overtime pay, money taken out for uniform, and when it rains so some fortnights I've only been paid $900. I'm depressed and if I lose my job I won't be able to get benefits straight away to pay my rent

Safety? What safety? Only provided a flimsy paper mask provided despite using an angle grinder on concrete. Digging trenches by hand. Carrying unreasonably heavy things with no trolley or safe lifting measures in place. Operating power tools with no training or gloves provided. The only safety gear is what I pick up around the work site. No WorkSafe training or information. Bullied and yelled at. I'm depressed, suicidal, hungry all the time because I can't afford food. Risking fine on the trains because I can't afford to get to work. Can't sleep. Affecting my relationship with my partner and family. It's just a feeling of hopelessness. I'm only 21 and I just feel no hope anymore I shouldn't need to explain, it's miserable. I've been exploited in every job I've had since I was 17. This happened at Frank Victoria a $3,000,000 house site in Templestowe, Melbourne when I was employed by howsitgoingmate. This happening in the construction industry. They won't fix it without banning all these casual and labour hire agencies. Big multimillion dollar companies love hiring through these agencies and don't seem to care if workers are exploited.


Anonymous (VTHC received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Permanency after a certain trial period

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. Shifts can be cancelled at short notice. Permanent staff pick up all the better penalty hours. Casual staff are treated with no respect by some permanent staff by taking shifts off us after they have been allocated if it is to their financial gain. The unknown of all the changes.


Anonymous (ASU received via VTHC)

On a rolling contract

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

I would abolish 0 hour contracts and give everyone on those type of contracts a minimum 12 hour contract. I'd also put more money into the public sector to ensure more jobs.

Story

I think I'm on a rolling contract in my current job. Well with a 0 hour contract I'm always worried that I won't be given enough shifts. 20 hours+ a week is roughly what I need to help make ends meet. Especially with the how the federal government is going. It makes me feel I won't be able to afford a family. I would abolish 0 hour contracts and give everyone on those type of contracts a minimum 12 hour contract. I'd also put more money into the public sector to ensure more jobs.


Anonymous (received via VTHC)

Supermarket
A directly employed casual by Franchise owner @ IGA

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

I would require greater security for casual workers who have been in a position for more than 6 months, such as sick leave. I would also enforce the correct payment of award wages.

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. I have found that my employer has not been paying the correct penalty rates according to our award. When I approached them about this I was advised that we were subject to an EBA; however, they could not tell me the name of the EBA. I have not been able to find the EBA through my own searches, nor has the Fair Work Ombudsman. After raising this matter, I lost all weekend shifts, thus reducing my overall pay, for at least one month.

I work in an antiquated small supermarket with no conveyer belt and poor ergonomic set up. I regularly suffer from neck, shoulder and back pain. In my employer's defence, planning objections have meant that they are unable to expand or renovate. This means that deliveries have to be pushed around the block in trolleys between the front and the back of the store. I do not have paid leave due to being a casual and have not been offered a part time position despite working there for over 12 months. Due to close contact with customers I suffered from a number of colds and viral infections this winter but felt that I was pressured into working when unwell by my employer. I felt that taking additional leave would jeopardise the future volume of work despite the fact that I was the one losing pay. In addition, despite advising my employer of my partner's regular days of work, I would regularly be rostered on for 2 or 3 of the days my partner didn't work. I am lucky that my partner's regular pay covered our mortgage but we were frequently juggling other bills such as rates and car registration when I lost pay for being sick. This happened at IGA when I was employed by franchise owner. This happened in the supermarket industry.


Anonymous (MEAA received via VTHC)

Informally employed

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Establish a modest, industry-wide 'holding fee' for actors who are on hold, in recognition that they are knocking back other work to keep themselves available for the project.

Story

I am an actor. Every single day I work is a different job. I do work both as a casual employee and invoiced work. Sometimes I book a date for weeks or months ahead, and it is cancelled at the last minute. I may have turned down other work to protect the booking. I have started to use a booking form that states a cancellation policy, but most of my colleagues are not that assertive. The most challenging are the production companies - they put you on hold for a week or a month. I have heard of cases of people being on hold for projects for more than a year. They expect you to be ready to come and work at a few days' notice. We all accept the challenges of scheduling in our industry, but it's challenging to manage. There is no financial exchange for being on hold - the assumption is that you are grateful to have a role. My suggestion would be to establish a modest, industry-wide 'holding fee' for actors who are on hold, in recognition that they are knocking back other work to keep themselves available for the project.


Liam Keighran, Gosford (MUA received via VTHC)

Shipping
On a rolling contract

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: true

Solution

I would work with employers, employee and respective union. I would not declare war on the industry and put hard working Australians out of work and replace us with cheap overseas labour as both Abbott and Turnbull government are doing.

Story

I was on a rolling contract in my current job near Gosford, working in the shipping industry.


Anonymous, Wodonga (VTHC received via VTHC)

Pet food manufacture
Employed through a labour hire agency by Skilled Albury @ Mar Petcare Wodonga

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Look into the casual labour hire market and tighten up on the length of time a particular position is kept casual. If the position lasts longer… let's say, 6 months, then that position must go permanent.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. Pay increases are part of the employment agency being awarded the contract. Pay and costs are kept to a minimum and negotiations are between agency and company. No negotiations are with us. It's simply, this is what you are getting, like it or leave. As a contractor on a shift, you are bottom of the ladder when it comes to annual leave allocation. The popular dates such as school holidays, long weekends are booked well in advance by associates, leaving no dates for contractors. My current position is a very physically demanding job with constant lifting of frozen meats. Its hard work and that's why it's carried out by contract labour. The associates simply will not do the job. I worry that if I get injured and unable to carry on in the position, no other work will be found for me. They will simply get another contractor. My position should be filled by an associate and we should be treated the same. My position has been filled by contractors for at least the last 6 years, but the same old story applies, if you don't like it, leave. This happened at Mar Petcare Wodonga, Wodonga when I was employed by Skilled Albury. This happened in the Petfood manufacture industry.


Mike Kelley, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Youth justice
A directly employed casual by DHS @ DHS Melbourne Youth Justice Centre

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Put in safety measures which provided more security and rights to casual labour as was as make it harder for organisations to have casual only workforces.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. I worked in juvenile justice and the risk of being hurt by the offenders was always high. I was attacked on 2 occasions and have mental health concerns as a result. The nature of the work was potentially risky and we were not adequately backed and supported by DHS with correct staffing levels and supervision. It's hard to plan as I was on call and did not want to stray too far in case I was called in for a shift. If I did make plans it meant going without leave pay. Having no job security made it very hard to budget and save, it was causing anxiety as I was never able to take much time off or go on leave because I had no leave entitlements and I would be missing out on shifts while away. Paying bills is difficult as was buying food because we did not have consistent money coming in. This happened at DHS Melbourne Youth Justice Centre, Melbourne when I was employed by DHS. This happened in the youth justice industry.


Gareth Husband, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Water
Employed through a labour hire agency by Skilltech @ Yarra Valley

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: true

Solution

I'd have a look at the definitions of casual and permanent. I would say you can't employ people as a casual if it's regular ongoing work.

Story

I was employed through Skilltech who hire and then send us out to in my case Yarra Valley. We were on a flat rate of approximately $22 an hour (covered by the Miscellaneous Award). At first there was productivity incentive bonus of earning up to $30 an hour if you read a lot of meters; they reduced this to $25 an hour. Under the Miscellaneous Award if you use your own car then you get paid 78 cents per km, but they don't do that. They basically say when you leave your house to wherever your route is going, it is considered to be "going to the office" so not paid. They will only pay for extra mileage if you're going more than 50kms out of your usual route. They will also pay us lost time if we have to go into a tool box meeting. They don't have a heat policy if it gets too hot (say 42 or 43 degrees) if I say I can't work as it's too hot do they pay us for the time not working (as we're casual). If it's a dangerous property a reader can leave a message for the next person to let them know. Because we are working on BEHALF of Yarra Valley rather than directly employed, I'm not sure where the ultimate responsibility lies. All of this I've discussed happens under SkillTech on behalf of Yarra Valley. If I was a PM I'd have a look at the definitions of casual and permanent. I would say you can't employ people as a casual if it's regular ongoing work.


Anonymous, Melbourne (VTHC received via VTHC)

Disability care
Informally employed

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Strengthen the award by increasing lengths of shifts reimbursement of genuine expenses. Increase basic rate and recognition of experience across all not just current employer. Portable long service leave. Ensure all workers are qualified also scrutinise the practices of the for profit providers

Story

I was informally employed more than a year ago. Never paid for travel despite often long distances and expectations to engage in activities but any expenses I incurred always "claim on your tax" which is months away and only a percentage of cost. Not paid to attend training. Basic training was at my expense. Not recognised for higher qualifications and level of experience. Hoisting and caring for very high support client on my own and NO briefing. Could only prep lab life by refusing work. Felt that I was "punished" for this as offers of work reduced. Fortunately for me I had a partner in regular employment.


Katrina Smith, Truganina (received via VTHC)

Warehousing
Employed through a labour hire agency by Programmed Integrated @ Pacific Brands

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency less than a year ago. Could never plan anything. I could get only 1 hour's notice of a shift. There was no guarantee of future shifts. Could be 5 a week or none for a month. This happened at Pacific Brands, Truganina when I was employed by Programmed Integrated. This happened in the Warehousing industry.


Filiz ( received via VTHC )

On a rolling contract

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Change the limit on contracts. Teaching contracts, especially graduate positions should go for a minimum of two years. Hire teachers with ongoing status allowing principals to put teachers on notice who are not meeting standards.

Story

I was on a rolling contract in my current job. The job is a one year contract, and it wasn't rolled over. The stress and anxiety that followed were having to apply for jobs for the following year, having completed over 100 applications with only 6 interviews and losing out to other teachers with more experience who are internal candidates or are cheaper. The market is extremely competitive. There are too many teachers and not enough positions and once in a position you don't get guaranteed more than 12 months of work. On top of applying for and interviewing for jobs which is a full time job by itself, I have to complete regular day to day duties as well as write reports which take up every spare moment on weekends and weeknights. Change the limit on contracts.


Anonymous, Newcastle (received via VTHC)

Security industry
Employed through a labour hire agency @ SNP subcontractor

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Prevent subcontracted agreement work which doesn't mean minimum wage for industry award casual work. Sliding scale taxation, more income means higher percentage tax - not the current opposite.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. An under $20 flat rate, for all hours and shift lengths regardless of warning, overtime, casual loading, night loading. No roster, 24/7 on call. The company I work for changed its ABN and business name every 3 months without warning. They cut our pay with no warning. I just noticed a lower pay rate in my payslip and asked, and that's when they told me we had a pay cut. I am constantly on call thus cannot go out because with friends or schedule things a week in advance because I may get called into work and need to be there in less than 30 minutes from the call in. Casual means one week I can do 20 hours and the next I will do 70 hours.


Anonymous (received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job.


Anonymous (received via VTHC)

Aviation
Employed through a labour hire agency by Maurice Alexander Management and Qantas Cabin Crew Australia @ Qantas Airways

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Regulate to stop companies like Qantas using labour hire companies to limit their obligations

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency less than a year ago. Qantas part 2 flight attendants are required to "owe hours" for taking genuine sick leave. The safety system is automated and managers bonus included staff sick leave and LTI Roster full of 'A days' - on call with 60 mins notice - or a month long 'reserve' roster $23 hr. This happened at Qantas Airways when I was employed by Maurice Alexandr Management and Qantas Cabin Crew Australia.


Anonymous, Urunga (received via VTHC)

Aged care
A directly employed casual by Payroll in the busker sing hone @ Royal Benevolent Freemasons society

Pay and Conditions        

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Remove this 3 month trial period and take it to 6-8 weeks. More rights for nurses fired this way. They simply used me up while permanent staff were away for Christmas. Then on top, what should also be... is proof when firing someone. Like in my case, she was definitely lying!!! And wouldn't take the time to go through things to prove/explain. Now due to this, she is not giving me sound references for other nursing jobs I go for. Therefore I can't get work anymore in nursing because this woman for some reason who honestly knows, didn't like me! Now it affects my long term employment options in a small town.

Story

I was a directly employed casual less than a year ago. Working as an AIN, I worked as many shifts as possible and never took sick days. I gave up time with my family over Christmas to fill the Xmas shifts. I wanted to show my work I was keen for permanent work, as I had been a casual working there three months and desperate for permanent shifts being a single mum with three kids on our own. I worked hard long hours over Christmas. Then on January 8th this year, I was told I was fired due to swearing at another nurse (which I can honestly say I never did nor never would!) Then she said I wasn't coming back from my 10 min breaks on time. I tried to explain to her that on those occasions I had been stopped by residents or staff on my way to leave- so left for my break a few mins late, hence coming back a bit later. Then she said I wasn't answering nurse calls which was absolute rubbish! That definitely isn't true. We have a log book which records time/date all nurse call requests and times answered. I asked her to pull up all my shifts and match them with the apparent ignored nurse calls- she wouldn't. She then said that my case notes weren't acceptable/being done- when I know there was only one shift where I was honestly run off my feet the whole time at work, plus missed my break- so didn't have time to log notes. But nothing major happened on my shift, so it was pointless. Had something needed to be written up urgently, then I would have stayed back unpaid to do it like I had done many times before!

When I first went for a job with them, due to me being fresh out of studies to become an AIN, they asked me if I had worked in a this sort of work before. I said I hadn't, but due to my precious experience in welfare, wound care management courses and experience, and other roles I had performed, my teachers at TAFE had passed me with recognition of prior learning exemptions from doing a voluntary placement. The general manager there said that she wasn't happy with me just doing a couple of buddy shifts, but wanted me to do 100 voluntary hours first, then she may offer my a casual role. I explained to her that AIN nursing is only 60-80 hours. She then said I was to do 80 hours then first if I was considered for a position. So I agreed to it, just so I had a chance of getting the job. I was just a few days short of my 3 month trial period before being considered for a permanent role when I was fired for incorrect reasons and no proof was supplied. This happened at Royal Benevolent Freemasons society, Urunga when I was employed by Payroll in the nursing home. This happened in the Aged care industry.


Anonymous, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Logistic
Informally employed by As above @ DB Schenker also at Airshow Geelong (a lot of issues and risk factors )

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Would change the possibilities for sponsorships - this company obviously dealt with the dream of people / Australia and brought them to a horrible situation. If you gave them advice they just send you away - again all documented...

Story

I was informally employed less than a year ago. No induction was given and everything was focused just on the work. They gave a shit of safety, well-being etc. Documentation from specified cases fully available but need to wait if I am back to Germany because I don't want to risk my paid airfare from this shit company. I had also an accident and they didn't explained anything to me - thanks for my doctor who let me know the facts. Focus was just the work as mentioned before, without specified inductions as well as safety instructions. Worked for the company 7 years in Germany and normally came over for the dream of Australia – sponsorship, but it was just a nightmare ... No meetings , no plan and finally need to worry about your health etc. This happened at DB Schenker also at Airshow Geelong (a lot of issues and risk factors), This happened in the Logistic industry. Would change the possibilities for sponsorships -and also integrate an ombudsman for these reasons.


Brad Lacey, Melbourne (ETU received via VTHC)

Electrical
On a rolling contract @ Select Solutions

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Force employers to hire full time employees as first port of call. Ban 457 visas unless all possible avenues are explored to hire local workers. Dismantle Trade Union Royal Commission. Expose profit shifting by multinational corporations. Cancel all free trade agreements. Greater clarity on tax paid by employers.

Story

I was on a rolling contract more than a year ago. Pay was fine (EBA) but due to the contract based employment any issues raised where generally regarded as problem causing by management, thus affecting your likelihood of securing another employment contract. Employees were encouraged by management to disregard testing procedures in order to get jobs done faster. Employees were also encouraged to climb on roofs to perform duties without harness attachment points or any fall prevention systems in place. It's never pleasant when you do not have an ongoing secure job. This combined with management using the downturn of the industry as a scare tactic did not make for a pleasant experience. This happened in Melbourne in the Electrical industry. Force employers to hire full time employees as first port of call. Ban 457 visas unless all possible avenues are explored to hire local workers. Dismantle trade union royal commission. Expose profit shifting by multinational corporations. Cancel all free trade agreements. Greater clarity on tax paid by employers.


Margaret Campbell, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Insurance
Employed through a labour hire agency by Arnold Group

Pay and Conditions        

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Reduce immigration. Allow casual work for 3 months only then a worker must be made permanent if job is to continue

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency more than a year ago. I was paid at the lowest rate for a case manager, but asked to perform a senior role. I was not receiving the casual rate applicable to a senior case manager. Very high workload. Don't know if I am going to have a job in a month. When I was employed by Arnold Group. This happened in the Insurance industry. Reduce immigration. Allow casual work for 3 months only then a worker must be made permanent if job is to continue


Anonymous, Ringwood (received via VTHC)

Retail
A directly employed casual by JB HiFi @ JB HiFi

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Recognise that workers have NO power and are at the beck and call of the employer who has all the power and makes all the money. Recognise that predictable rosters do NOT mean time can be spent with family as there is no recognition by employers of the workers family's work hours. Workers MUST be compensated for giving up weekends as this is when children are home. Their school hours are Monday to Friday, weekend workers miss out on time with their children. Politicians spend large sums of money to give politicians time with their families including children because of their minimal times (30 weeks a year) on weekends with their children. Why is it different for workers on shift work that requires they work weekends? What about Sundays for those who are practicing Christians and want to attend Church? As usual the politicians think only of the companies with money and power and NOT the workers without whom the companies would NOT make any money – shame.

Story

Members of my family were directly employed casuals more than a year ago. It was made very clear that there were plenty more to take the work if we were not happy. Being casual or part time it could be terminated at any time at the whim of the employer. This happened at JB HiFi and is common to most retail outlets. All need to recognise that workers have NO power and are at the beck and call of the employer who has all the power and makes all the money. Recognise that predictable rosters do NOT mean time can be spent with family as there is no recognition by employers of the workers family's free hours. Workers MUST be compensated for giving up weekends as this is when children & spouses are home. Primary care givers are home when their children are and as children's school hours are Monday to Friday, weekend workers miss out on time with their whole family. Politicians spend large sums of tax payers' money to give politicians time with their families including children because of their minimal times (30 weeks a year) on weekends with their children. Why is it different for workers on shift work who work 52 weeks of the year for a barely liveable wage that mostly requires that they work weekends? Further - what about Sundays for those who are practicing Christians and want to attend Church? As usual the politicians and public servants (week workers only) making changes to labour laws, think only of the companies with money and power and NOT the workers without whom the companies would NOT make any money – shame.

Anonymous, Inner Northern Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Community aged care sector - professional sector
Employed through a labour hire agency

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

  1. Ongoing position test e.g. is this position indicating that there is need and scope to frame an ongoing or fixed-term position within that workplace?
  2. Sliding scale fixed-term contracts e.g. higher rate of pay the shorter the contract period up to 12 months
  3. Mandate that agencies pay actual casual employees the actual equivalent casual penalty rate e.g. industry hourly rate is $35 per hour so a casual employee gets paid $52.50 per hour. (Currently agencies charge employer circa $70 per hour and pocket the employees' casual entitlements.)

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. My hourly rate of pay as a casual worker in NO way reflects offset for sick leave, annual leave or public holidays or access to salary packaging. I am being paid almost same hourly rate as my colleagues but the agencies are charging the employer close to double what I earn. How is that reflective of award conditions being met? In my type of work employees can be exposed to quite extreme personal emotional and verbal abuse and threats from clients, family under social stress or who are personally belligerent. As an OH&S rep I have seen workplace intimidation occur where employees are put under implicit pressure to work with such clients by managers. As a casual, your industrial rights and status in a work place are viewed and treated sometimes as just that - casually.

Life adjustment after targeted redundancy (despite appropriate positions being available redeployment is not actually supported) leads to major challenges to self and social esteem. As an older worker and single parent I have had to throw away any expectation of future certainty, through support or reward for length of service and sick leave accrued. I'm struggling in esteem and seek professional help to deal with this major life change. I work in aged care industry and the irony of how my major health organisation treats older workers has not been lost on those affected. HR is just burn and churn to beat budgets back.

As a sole parent effectively supporting a young adult for housing, bills etc ( who is also on 'part-time' casual work, herself) it's next to impossible to plan or predict. For example, I have just finished a 2 month contract with no known certainty about if/when more will become available. My landlord is still there. Bills still arriving .Centrelink is not going to help until I eat up all my modest redundancy payout (compensation for sick leave, holidays I thought). It's a downward spiral, regressive and all about the employer's needs. The irony is that my workplace's production and quality was suffering because of the lack of permanent or long-term contract staff. Pinching pennies to lose pounds management were inept and careless in respect of this, as under constant arbitrary directives. This happened in the Community aged care sector - professional sector industry.


Mohammad Iqbal, Reservoir (VTHC received via VTHC)

Disability
A directly employed casual by DHHS @ DHHS

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: true

Solution

Give more support to carer. Increase the pay. Make more secure position for job.


 John Islip (VTHC received via VTHC)

Construction
Employed through a labour hire agency by programmed

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Ban casual workers working more than 20 hours a week. If you do more than 20 hours, then it's penalty rates

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency less than a year ago. I was told 50 hours a week, 8 weeks work. It was in fact 32 hours a week, 2 weeks work. I passed up another job opportunity because the employment agency lied to me about these hours and contract length. The wind was fiercely blowing a temporary fence which I had to work next to. I was made to provide my own hard hat and safety protection clothes. I had a doctor's appointment. I gave the supervisor on site a few days prior notice. The agency rang me demanding to know where I was and what's wrong with me. They were suggesting I was getting a medical for another job when in fact I was having a yearly cardiologist appointment. Being a casual, I had one hour's notice of work termination. Because you could have work terminated in an hour, I was always stressed it could be my last hour. If you worked too fast to look good it could be unsafe work practices. It could also lead you to finishing the job quickly hence ending employment. If you work slowly, you may end up unemployed. This happened in the construction industry. Ban casual workers working more than 20 hours a week. If you do more than 20 hours, then it's penalty rates


Anonymous (received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. I rarely got any shifts and was not paid any penalty rates. I wasn't getting enough shifts and because it was casual I had to ring up every few days to find out. Shifts would change without notice.


Catherine (CPSU_SPSF received via VTHC)

On a rolling contract

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Limit a number of casuals to a percentage? Deem permanent unless prove casual?

Story

HIDDEN: I was on a rolling contract more than a year ago. Lack of a permanent job made it difficult to get a bank loan/ mortgage. Plus, the EBA said if you were on a contract for 3 years you were supposed to be made permanent. So your contracts lasted 2 years 10 months in total... limit a number of casuals to a percentage? Deem permanent unless prove casual?


Anonymous (VTHC received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual             

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

My sector was (is - if I can return) is public education. Committing to the full Gonski funding would be a start along with tightening requirements for skilled migration in education for teachers.

Story

I was a directly employed casual less than a year ago. As a casual, you are replaceable. I was not able to approach my employer for fear of being perceived as a troublemaker. An impression of not being committed to a job is conveyed. I experience debilitating depression and anxiety. 10 years of casual work has left me with little to no self-confidence, which impacts upon my ability to look for and apply for future work (most of which happens to also be casual). My sector was (is - if I can return) is public education. Committing to the full Gonski funding would be a start along with tightening requirements for skilled migration in education for teachers.


Anonymous, Brookfield (received via VTHC)

International Development
a directly employed casual by Australian Volunteers International (AVI) @ Australian Volunteers International (AVI)

Pay and Conditions       

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Get rid of those visas for workers from overseas, encourage small business, get big business and corporations to at least pay some tax, bring back the mining tax it made sense to me Labor didn't sell it properly, traineeships for youth and adults.

Story

I was a directly employed casual less than a year ago. It was a government funded position with a NGO and the funding stopped in June 2015, and now I am unemployed and finding it difficult to find alternative employment This happened at Australian Volunteers International (AVI), Brookfield when I was employed by Australian Volunteers International (AVI). This happened in the International Development industry. Get rid of those visas for workers from overseas, encourage small business, get big business and corporations to at least pay some tax, bring back the mining tax it made sense to me Labor didn't sell it properly, traineeships for youth and adults.


Lana Clark, Tullamarine (VTHC received via VTHC)

Construction
Employed through a labour hire agency

Pay and Conditions        

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Full time employment is now a luxury in Australia and labour hire is a cancer eating away our jobs

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. Unable to support my children and pay mortgage as I do not have a regular permanent income. This happened in the construction industry. Full time employment is now a luxury in Australia and labour hire is a cancer eating away our jobs


Anonymous, Melbourne (VTHC received via VTHC)

As previously mentioned above
informally employed by as above @ Multiple and various since 1989 to present

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: true

Solution

Too many areas to cover at this point in time… "Trust me I'm a Registered Psychiatrist Nurse"

Story

I was informally employed more than a lifetime ago...This happened at multiple and various jobs. Commencing, approximately around, 1989 up to and including the present day! Ranging from suburbs in and around Melbourne. Not forgetting to mention, some international locations most likely too! "Trust me. When I say. I have been everything to everyone, at one time or another... A Jill of all trades...Altruistic until the end of time..."


Mike Kilby, Dandenong (ETU received via VTHC)

Manufacturing
Employed through a labour hire agency by Australia Wide Labour Hire @ Lowbake Ltd. [they make spray paint booths and ovens]

Pay and Conditions          

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Make law that workers who do physical work, "blue collar" workers, retire 5-10 years earlier than those who work more less physical jobs. Like the Russian model! Make ageism illegal, because employers work around it to their advantage to exploit workers, for out and out greed!

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. I'm an A Grade electrician, working as a T.A. [trades assistant], doing electrical work that no trades assistant would have the know-how to do. For the much lower T.A. wage. I am dealing with "ageism" in the work place. They know how difficult it is to find work for an "older worker". I'm 61, and I'm in good physical shape and very healthy, but, I'm 61. I do not want to work until I'm physically unable to, or until I'm injured. I want decent and fair paid part-time work, with holidays and sick pay, like everybody else should have. That's what an advanced society would have. I feel like I've stepped back, being older, back into the 1970s. This happened at Lowbake Ltd. [they make spray paint booths and ovens], Dandenong when I was employed by Australia Wide Labour Hire. This happened in the manufacturing industry. Make law that workers who do physical work, "blue collar" workers, retire 5-10 years earlier than those who work more less physical jobs. Like the Russian model! Make ageism illegal, because employers work around it to their advantage to exploit workers, for out and out greed!


Anonymous, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Casual recruitment agency and the work was for Public Transport Victoria and Metro and Yarra trams
Employed through a labour hire agency by Hobans Recruitment @ Hobans Recruitment

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

There is no easy solution as we have high under and or unemployment and it is all employers who have the power and control. As has been in the recent press, there are major employers out there who are exploiting overseas workers, getting them on the cheap and this leave local workers out of the picture as employers know they have to pay local workers the minimal wages. It is a non-win situation for all employees and this is not going to change in the short term or perhaps never.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency less than a year ago. I have been paid the minimum wage please casual loading, however through a labour hire you never know when you will get work and the conditions are poor. One does not complain as it is a fair assumption that if you complain you will not be called for further work. It makes for a very compliant workforce as well as a fairly non trusting culture between colleagues and with management. It was on train stations, and at tram stops in all sorts of weather, day and or night. Sometimes there were no accessible toilets and I have had to leave my post to try and find a public toilet within the surrounding area. Sometimes not told where the available toilets were and one had to ask staff of Public Transport Victoria where toilets were. On very hot nights not given water. There was no discussions about leaving the job and one would have to ring on personal mobile and negotiate this. As previously stated there is no guarantee of further work and if is a fair assumption that if you complained or spoke up that you would not get further shifts. This happened at Hobans Recruitment, Melbourne when I was employed by Hobans Recruitment. This happened in the casual recruitment agency and the work was for Public Transport Victoria and Metro and Yarra trams industry. There is no easy solution as we have high under and or unemployment and it is all employers who have the power and control. As has been in the recent press, there are major employers out there who are exploiting overseas workers, getting them on the cheap and this leave local workers out of the picture as employers know they have to pay local workers the minimal wages. It is a no win situation for all employees and this is not going to change in the short term or perhaps never.


Anonymous, Portland (AWU received via VTHC)

Disability
A directly employed casual by DHHS

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Have set minimum hours would help

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. If you complain you lose hours. Was assaulted at work. When I was proposed to do return to work shifts I was told I was casual so I had to get my own shifts. You have to stress all the time as to whether you are going to get any work for the week to pay your rent. You don't know what you are going to get. So you have to see how much pay you get to see what you pay or do. This happened at DHHS, Portland when I was employed by DHHS. This happened in the disability industry. Have set minimum hours would help


Anonymous, Newborough (received via VTHC)

Vocational Training
A directly employed casual by GippsTAFE @ GippsTAFE

Pay and Conditions            

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Cease payments to private training institutions and re-establish TAFE as the foundation of vocational training.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. Working as a casual TAFE teacher, required to do all preparatory work whilst only paid for face to face class time. No holiday pay. Work was terminated abruptly due to Liberal Government TAFE cuts. Finding work after being terminated. This happened at GippsTAFE, Newborough when I was employed by GippsTAFE. This happened in the Vocational Training industry. Cease payments to private training institutions and re-establish TAFE as the foundation of vocational training.


Anonymous (ETU received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Offer companies financial incentives to employ full time staff. Increase the difference in hourly rate between casual and full time. Let casual employees accrue A/L.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. Being paid as a casual for more than 12 months. This caused a great amount of stress, knowing that you could lose your job any day! Not being able to loan money, take a sick day, or plan a holiday made it even worse. You're employed casually, if you speak up you lose your job. If you go on holiday you have to hope they have work when you come back. Offer companies financial incentives to employ full time staff. Increase the difference in hourly rate between casual and full time. Let casual employees accrue A/L.


Loriana Luccioni, Brisbane (received via VTHC)

Hospitality
A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

I would limit the circumstances in which employers are able to opt for this form of insecure jobs: one way to incentivise this is by raising hourly rates for this contracts. Many industries have been totally left in the hands of a volatile market and although the employers assume many of the correlated risks, employees pay the hardest consequences both materially and psychologically. On the other hand, measures such as wage subsidies for the lowest, most insecure jobs should be guaranteed. Passive policies however, should be always be accompanied by active ones such as vocational/professional training, volunteering... anything that can help people trapped in these forms of job to develop further skills, to feel less isolated, helpless and hopeless.

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job in Brisbane. This happened in the hospitality industry. I would limit the circumstances in which employers are able to opt for this form of insecure jobs: one way to incentivise this is by raising hourly rates for this contracts, to give a more powerful voice to employees themselves, without fear of losing their job, being discriminated against or bullied. It must be acknowledged that this phenomenon is not new, and is happening on a global scale.

Many industries have been totally left in the hands of a volatile market and although the employers assume many of the correlated risks, employees pay the hardest consequences both materially and psychologically. However, we must not accept things as they are: measures such as wage subsidies for the lowest, most insecure jobs should be guaranteed. Society as a whole should take responsibility for the good and bad that chosen courses of action cause. Passive policies however, should always be accompanied by active ones such as vocational/professional training, volunteering... anything that can help people trapped in these forms of job to develop further skills, to feel less isolated, helpless and hopeless.


Anonymous, Footscray (received via VTHC)

Education and training
Contracting with an ABN but to one employer only by WCIG @ WCIG

Pay and Conditions           

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Story

I was contracting with an ABN but to one employer only more than a year ago. Just that I wasn't paid a salary normally simply so the employer could avoid paying super etc. This happened at WCIG, Footscray when I was employed by WCIG. This happened in the education and training industry.


Anonymous, Yarra Glen (received via VTHC)

Hospitality
A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Retain weekend penalties.

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. Casually employed on a flat rate of pay throughout the week. There are no weekend penalties. The EBA I have been shown is incomplete and has no date. I have worked in this position for over a year. My partner has a low prevalence mental health disorder and is not able to work all the time. I have been supporting a family of 4 on a casual wage. We are constantly struggling to pay bills and the mortgage and put food on the table. It makes me feel sick to think about Christmas and how we are going to manage to buy presents. I have recently had to have a small operation on my hand requiring 2 weeks off work. The wound became infected which meant that I had 4 weeks off work and no income which was very difficult. I previously had a permanent job but was made redundant in an organisational restructure. In this position I at least had sick leave and a regular defined income. This happened in the hospitality industry. Retain weekend penalties.


Sam Linhart ( received via VTHC )

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions       

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Keep the tax free threshold as high as possible (20k+). Not be considering regressive taxation (like a higher/broader GST)!

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. Each week I submit availability for shifts the following week. I consistently give the same 3 days. I never know how much work I'll get. Could be 8, 16 or more hours. If I relied solely on my income, I couldn't stay working like this. To help myself and others in similar situations, the Government needs to keep the tax free threshold as high as possible (20k+) and certainly not be considering regressive taxation (like a higher/broader GST)!


Venessa Quinn, Lysterfield ( SDA received via VTHC )

Retail
A directly employed casual by ALH @ Dan Murphy's

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Make sure that contracts are honoured and provide financial assistance to employees so they can hold the employer accountable and be suitably compensated for breached contracts

Story

I was a directly employed casual less than a year ago. My contract said that I was guaranteed at least ten hours per week, and at the start they complied but after about two months my hours slowly got less to the point where I was only getting 4-5 hours per fortnight if I was lucky. I had committed to some financial obligations that I planned around my pay but in the end I was unable to meet those commitments and had to enter into a debt agreement. This happened at Dan Murphy's, Lysterfield when I was employed by ALH. Make sure that contracts are honoured and provide financial assistance to employees so they can hold the employer accountable and be suitably compensated for breached contracts


Anonymous ( received via VTHC )

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

I would find avenues for people to have permanent work - through developing skills, small business development, start-up support, job creation, multi-skilling, etc.

Story

I was a directly employed casual less than 3 months ago. I did a number of shifts and wasn't paid. When I approached the employer to request my pay he told me that he had already paid the sub-contractor. I went to the sub-contractor to request my pay and he did nothing. I had to contact him many times before I got my pay. I was working in security, being underpaid and wasn't covered by the employer for injuries. I was expected to provide my own WorkCover insurance even though I was earning very little and couldn't afford the insurance cover. Working in security involved some risk and, if I had been injured, I wouldn't have had any insurance cover.

The work was very inconsistent and sometimes I had to work with half an hour's notice. I have a wife and three children and it was impossible to plan for family time or to consistently support my wife to look after the baby. Not having regular shifts meant we didn't have enough income to meet our basic living expenses. A lot of the time there was no money for rent, food or bills and we had to get food baskets from a local charity. I had to borrow money from friends to pay the rent when we got too far behind and were being threatened with eviction. I have three children under five years old. Whenever there was not enough income the stress would make me very anxious and I found it hard to cope with the kids' noise and mess. I would yell at the kids very easily.

It was very hard to know how to get out of the terrible financial difficulties because there are very few jobs around and most of them are casual and insecure. I would find avenues for people to have permanent work - through developing skills, small business development, start-up support, job creation, multi-skilling, etc.


Anonymous, Melbourne (ACTU received via VTHC)

Traffic Control
Employed through a labour hire agency by Workforce International @ Citywide

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Outlaw casual work practices where there are over 100 casuals with enough work for 30. The favourites or family/cultural preferences dominate.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency in my current job. No toilet or rest breaks catered for. This happened at Citywide, Melbourne when I was employed by Workforce International. Outlaw casual work practices where there are over 100 casuals with enough work for 30. The favourites or family/cultural preferences dominate when work is allocated, reflecting poor work practices by Citywide in not employing full time permanent staff.


Conor (ASU received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

More thoroughly audit hospitality industries to enforce existing workplace laws around pay and conditions for workers.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. It was a cash job and I wasn't earning any superannuation. My workplace had greasy floors and my job required heavy lifting. I developed back problems and I had to be very careful when walking around so I didn't slip over. I would find out about my roster for the week ahead on the Sunday afternoon or Monday morning and I wouldn't know how many shifts I'd be working. I'd often be knocked off early anyway so even if I had the right number of shifts, they weren't a set amount of time so I couldn't plan ahead financially, or plan socially for the week ahead because I didn't know when I'd be at work or when I'd be free, or if I'd earn enough money to spend some on socialising. You just worry all the time because of all the things you can't guarantee you'll be able to do, but that you need to do. It's stressful to have to borrow money to make rent, and then have to pay that back as well as pay next rent. More thoroughly audit hospitality industries to enforce existing workplace laws around pay and conditions for workers.


Anonymous, Melbourne (received via VTHC)

Pilates
Contracting with an ABN but to one employer only

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: true

Solution

Legislate for people working in the same work place for more than several months to have entitlements for sick pay and holiday leave.

Story

I am contracting with an ABN but to one employer only in my current job. I have been with this same workplace for more than 3 years. I feel secure in my job but at my boss's discretion my shifts can be cancelled or shortened and this means my pay is variable from week to week. I find it hard to financial plan and to feel secure as am often living from pay to pay. I rarely take holidays or sick leave as I can't afford not to be paid. I find it difficult to put aside tax from my pay as I then can't afford my basic living costs. Each year I end up with a tax bill that is financially debilitating. This happened in the pilates industry. Legislate for people working in the same work place for more than several months to have entitlements to become employees, to have tax deducted by the employer and to be entitled to sick pay and leave.


Anonymous, Melbourne (VTHC received via VTHC)

Australian Public Service
on a rolling contract

Pay and Conditions            

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Much stronger regulation concerning temporary or casual employment.

Story

I was on a rolling contract more than a year ago. I was on temporary contracts which lasted from two to three years. This was much better than many of my colleagues who were on much shorter contracts. Approaching the end of each contract was very stressful. The employer gave some staff only a few days' notice of whether a new contract would be available. In my case, my boss gave much longer notification of a new contract (I've been blessed to have good immediate bosses), but I have many colleagues who were given only a few days' notice. In one case a colleague who is a single mother on a low income was only told she had a job on Monday at 3pm on the Friday before. In my own case, I was not an Australian citizen at the time (I am from New Zealand), so I did not have any backup of the dole or other benefits. My job is quite specialised, and there is only one main employer in Australia, so I would have been in deep trouble if my contract was not renewed. Things are a bit better now. Personally I have a permanent job. And, my union (I'm also a delegate) pressured the employer to give much longer notification to temporary staff about if they'll get a new contract (typically two or three months instead of a few days' notice). But as a result of about seven or eight years of insecure employment, I don't think I'll ever be able to afford a house of my own (because getting a mortgage is out of the question if one has insecure employment, and now house prices are over half a million dollars in Melbourne ... totally unaffordable)


Ryan, Traralgon (received via VTHC)

Construction
Employed through a labour hire agency by Sure construction @ Sure constructions

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

I would tax the shit out of big business and the stupidly rich!

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency less than a year ago. Cause bosses don't care about us and our living, they care about them making money. Bills keep coming in and the money doesn't Thought about killing myself. This happened at Sure Constructions, Traralgon when I was employed by Sure construction . This happened in the construction industry. I would tax the shit out of big business and the stupidly rich!


Anonymous (received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Casual work means you can't raise concerns. There were pornographic pictures all over the office (I was on the factory floor but I had to go in there from time-to-time) but I couldn't say anything because my hours could have been cut. It is shameful Australia doesn't think it's hard. Workers deserve dignity, security and fair working conditions.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. Casual work means you can't raise concerns. There were pornographic pictures all over the office (I was on the factory floor but I had to go in there from time-to-time) but I couldn't say anything because my hours could have been cut. It is shameful Australia doesn't think it's hard. Workers deserve dignity, security and fair working conditions.


Anonymous, Mildura (received via VTHC)

Arts and design
Contracting with an ABN but to one employer only by Council/labour hire company @ Mildura rural city council

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Put a limit on how long people can be hired as casuals or contractors. And apply serious penalties to those employers that use casual workers on a full time basis long term

Story

I was contracting with an ABN and working as labour hire at the same workplace during the same period. The problem is no penalties rates and job insecurity. I have no recourse for dispute settlement, if I complain they'll tell me the work dried up. It's that simple. Asked to take risks with heavy items regularly, if I complain then they'll get a new contractor. Job could end or another contractor come along at any time. It's down to the bosses' discretion. This happened at Mildura rural city council, Mildura when I was employed by Council and a labour hire company to do the same job in the same work place. This happened in the arts and design industry. Put a limit on how long people can be hired as casuals or contractors. And apply serious penalties to those employers that use casual workers on a full time basis long term.


Anonymous, Box Hill office for work in Ballarat area (VTHC received via VTHC)

Employed through a labour hire agency by Mcather @ DHHS

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

The government needs to tighten up laws on using casual labour to ensure that if the work is continuing there should be some way to bring an action for unfair withholding of shifts or work if the employer cannot provide a valid reason.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency more than a year ago. It took several weeks for pay to be paid. This happened several times. I was working three to four times a week and needed to swap a day. They agreed by email then mixed the day up and blamed me. They did not want to pay for some small work expenses. Then they found someone else because I spoke up about these issues. This happened at DHHS, Box Hill office for work in Ballarat area when I was employed by Mcather. The government needs to tighten up laws on using casual labour to ensure that if the work is continuing there should be some way to bring an action for unfair withholding of shifts or work if the employer cannot provide a valid reason.


Lisa Simons, Melbourne (CPSU_PSU received via VTHC)

Telecommunications
Employed through a labour hire agency by Teletech @ Telstra

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Make employers allow workers to become permanent direct employees. Stop sham contracting, allow relevant unions to give inductions about workers' rights for all new employees

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency more than a year ago. I applied for a job with Telstra (had the Telstra logo) but I was hired through a labour hire agency, Teletech. We were advised that if we toed the line we might get made permanent in a year or so. I moved on but Telstra is still doing this through Julia Ross, Chandler McLeod and Ageis employment. Friends of mine have been working there long enough for long service but no sick pay and threatened with the sack, now they are being made redundant. Had to share phone headsets. Anyone that took time off for careers leave was sacked as an example. A friend was homeless sleeping in her car outside the call centre after she lost her lease due to the real estate not wanting to rent to a casual. This happened at Telstra, Melbourne City when I was employed by Teletech. This happened in the Telecommunications industry. Make employers allow workers to become permanent direct employees. Stop sham contracting, allow relevant unions to give inductions about workers' rights for all new employees


Antony Lerufi (received via VTHC)

On a rolling contract

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Story

I was on a rolling contract more than a year ago.


Toni Rosini (received via VTHC)

Employed through a labour hire agency by D @ Telstra

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Prevent companies moving jobs off-shore and reduce the casualization that is prevalent in so many industries.

Story

I was employed through a labour hire agency more than a year ago. You take it or leave it and are advised to look for other positions that are permanent, because it's not going to happen working here. (DFP - Telstra Ballarat pre 2007) Working in an office the DFP staff did not believe there were problems with health and safety. Once a colleague walked into a desk and injured his knee, they did not believe him and he was told to deal with it himself... You did not get holidays, at all. Or you were replaced. There was no security whatsoever, is was refused a bank loan because of the nature of my employment. This happened at Telstra. Prevent companies moving jobs off-shore and reduce the casualization that is prevalent in so many industries.


Amy Fitzgerald, Clayton (VTHC received via VTHC)

Communications
Contracting with an ABN but to one employer only by Monash University @ Monash University

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Take a harder line on contracts. I think that the reason they were using contractors was because they wanted to be able to quickly terminate everyone if the program we were working on wasn't successful. These kind of conditions need to be advertised up front - if I had known the job was so insecure I would never have even applied. The laws surrounding contracting need to be changed so that businesses and organisations don't feel like there's a benefit to them in keeping workers hanging on. Things like harsher penalties against businesses who break contracts so early on (e.g. if you break a contract you have to pay it out in full), plus investigations into workplaces which seem to have a very high number of contractors. If I recall correctly, the only people who weren't contractors in my workplace were those on 457 or partner visas (and they were just told to resign when the rest of us were terminated).

Story

I was contracting with an ABN but to one employer only less than a year ago. I had to give up my part-time (relatively) secure retail job as my boss wasn't willing to let me work less hours for him in order to hold on to it, despite being a contractor. I gave up my part-time job because I believed my boss when he said that the contracts were just a "short-term" thing and we were all going to be moved to permanent employee status in the new year. As a recent graduate wanting to get started in communications, I knew job opportunities in the industry were scarce. I was required to be in the office between 9am and 5pm, but the boss would imply that people who weren't starting earlier or finishing later weren't pulling their weight in the team. We were not permitted to work remotely or sub-contract out our work. Several times the woman who ran the invoices missed my invoices, when I mentioned that I was planning on contacting my union to discuss the issue further she told me that I couldn't contact the union and as a contractor I essentially had no rights. Several times I had to borrow money from my parents, or go to their houses for meals, because she hadn't run my invoices. As someone who has been a union member for many years, this was a nasty shock. My first contract was short term from September to December.

My second "full time" contract from January to June was terminated after a month due to "operational reasons" along with the majority of the team. This is despite repeated promises that we were all going to be moved to be proper employees "soon". The woman who ran the invoices made a big deal about how all our contracts had to be scanned back to her because otherwise they weren't legal - turns out they weren't worth the paper they were written on, anyway. I tried to talk to her about the problems that missed payments were causing me, but she was nasty and aggressive. Later when I tried to contact her to get a statement stating my contract had been terminated for Centrelink purposes, she was unhelpful, refused to provide a statement and then (eventually) directed me to someone who according to her had the power to confirm that I had worked there - after my Centrelink deadline had passed.

We were not informed of any kind of WorkCover or OH&S procedure. The boss would get openly angry and exasperated with people who took time off for illness - including people who were physically unable to travel to work or had medical certificates. Workplace law needs to take a harder line on contracts. I think that the reason they were using contractors was because they wanted to be able to quickly terminate everyone if the program we were working on wasn't successful. These kind of conditions need to be advertised up front - if I had known the job was so insecure I would never have even applied. The laws surrounding contracting need to be changed so that businesses and organisations don't feel like there's a benefit to them in keeping workers hanging on. Things like harsher penalties against businesses who break contracts so early on (e.g. if you break a contract you have to pay it out in full), plus investigations into workplaces which seem to have a very high number of contractors. The only people who weren't contractors in my workplace were those on 457 or partner visas (and they were just told to resign when the rest of us were terminated).

We also need to better educate young people to look out for sham contracting and other exploitative business practices. After spending nearly 10 years in retail, I had no idea what sham contracting looked like, and it was only when I was in it up to my neck that it occurred to me what was happening. The wider public seem to believe that this kind of workplace exploitation is rare, or only happens to people who don't know their rights - but I always considered myself to be fairly savvy, and I still got screwed because protections for contractors either don't exist or aren't enforced.


Cameron Hill, Melbourne Airport, Tullamarine (ETU received via VTHC)

Construction
Informally employed by Per request @ Per request

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Ban casual labour over 4 months, create and implement heavier fines for companies that abuse causal labour, create taxes for labour hire companies so they have to pay more.

Story

I was informally employed in my current job. Asked about pay, health and safety over the past few months and have faced intimidation and bullying. Now face a termination meeting this week that being held and my company's newly appointed industrial lawyers office I nominated myself to be a HSR, the guys in the supposed workgroup all supported me. 2 days later I was shipped off to Queensland site put on yard duties which has isolated me from the other workers. I'm full time however I can name many people on my site of people that have try to ask about pay, conditions and safety and have been pushed out the door because they were all casuals. My company has only a hand full of full time employees and an army of casual/subcontractors. One employee even emailed the client and the company with problems and issues I have just had over 2 weeks off with stress leave while my union is in dispute with the employer. I was bullied so much after they sent me to Queensland that I walked off the site and booked myself the very next flight home. I'm now out of pocket around $1000 and facing no income. My company doesn't follow its own agreement regarding the transition to full time employment. It tries to keep everyone from having rights. Ban casual labour over 4 months, create and implement heavier fines for companies that's abuse causal labour, create taxes for labour hire companies so they have to pay more.


Ian Freeman (received via VTHC)

A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Secure casual wards and conditions, maternity leave, carers leave, nominal sick leave etc.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. Underpaid and deductions not pre mentioned. Never mentioned. Very intermittent work. Constant struggle to meet payments on time. Secure casual wards and conditions, maternity leave, carers leave, nominal sick leave etc.


Jay, Melbourne (ETU received via VTHC)

Electrical
A directly employed casual by Downer EDI @ VCCC, Grocon

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Enforce stricter rules on the use of casual and contract employment. It should be used in very limited circumstances.

Story

I undertook an electrical apprenticeship with a large company and completed it. I was employed permanently, full-time ongoing thereafter as a qualified A-Grade electrician. After over a year being fully qualified, whilst working on a large Grocon construction site in the CBD, I was made redundant in a round of redundancies a few months ago. About three weeks after being made redundant, I was called back by the company and offered ongoing casual employment; I took up the offer as I hadn't found work. The casual work was demanding, full-time hours, some night shift work and lots of overtime. After eight weeks of casual employment the EBA says I was to transition and be employed on a full-time, permanent basis again, but this didn't happen. I was too afraid to speak up for fear of losing work. I was let go by the company after 14 weeks of casual employment, and more than five years full-time employment with the same company before that. More people were hired after the redundancies and after casuals were let go.

Electrical testing began on the site before all electrical work was completed. Workers were working on projects while testing was being done, despite that not being allowed. Areas on site undergoing testing have to unpowered, but this didn't happen. The areas remained powered and testing was being undertaken on site whilst electrical workers were working, against health and safety regulations. As I was employed as a casual, hoping to be put back on to a permanent contract, I was not confident to speak up about health and safety issues for fear of losing my job again. My partner injured herself quite badly whilst I was casually employed and needed caring for. I had to take time off to care for her, without pay. This created financial stress and set us back financially. This happened in the electrical industry. Enforce stricter rules on the use of casual and short term contract employees. It should be used in very, very limited circumstances.


Anonymous, Geelong (MUA received via VTHC)

Transport and logistics
A directly employed casual

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Stop other human being able to do this to others. I would try and give more people steady work than to have them in a mental tolling situation like I am in. I just want to work hard and get paid a decent wage and get some time with my family.

Story

I was a directly employed casual in my current job. Told whenever we ask that were hired muscle and if we don't like it there's the gate he can find 1000 of people to do our job. We have been make to work in places with little or no light inadequate safe gear and such. My wife and I fight. I miss time with my boys. The whole family revolves around my job and come Sunday if there's not enough money we struggle. I'm on anti-depression medication because of the uncertainty of my income. I don't know how we will live week to week and the bullying I have suffered doesn't help at all. This happened in the transport and logistics industry. Stop other human being able to do this to others. I would try and give more people steady work than to have them in a mental tolling situation like I am in. I just want to work hard and get paid a decent wage and get some time with my family.


Anonymous, Melbourne (VTHC received via VTHC)

Education
a directly employed casual by Navitas @ Hawthorn Campus, Navitas, Auburn Rd, Hawthorn.

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: false

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

Legislate against casualisation of teaching.

Story

I was a directly employed casual more than a year ago. Heating and cooling systems frequently broke down. New carpets and fittings in public areas while teachers had to contend with broken chairs, carpet stuck down with duct tape, filthy and dilapidated kitchen equipment. Difficulty collecting children. Constantly changing schedules so I could not keep a place in childcare. Laid off during quiet periods with no money. When laid off, I and many other teachers had no income. This happened at Hawthorn Campus, Navitas, Auburn Rd, Hawthorn, Melbourne when I was employed by Navitas. This happened in the education industry. Legislate against casualisation of teaching.


Anonymous, Portsea (received via YWC)

Law
Informally employed by Michael Moorehead @ Moorehead Lawyers

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: false

Safe work: false

Predictable Roster: true

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: false

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: false

Leave: false

Future secure: false

Solution

There should be criminal penalties for this sort of exploitation. 'Employees' in these sorts of arrangements need to be protected as an employee by fair work, and taken seriously, rather than slip through the cracks because they don't fit the mould. It's akin to slavery. In professional services, such as law, practitioners engaging in this conduct should be stripped of their practicing certificates and prevented from working in the industry.

Story          

I was informally employed more than a year ago. I was "employed" as a junior lawyer/law graduate and required to work 9-5 Monday to Friday. I was not paid a salary at all, and instead was given a portion of the fees I billed to clients. My "boss" was entirely in charge of my rate, and what I billed. He had the control to write off my time. I was paid weekly, often as little as $70 for a full week's employment. My "boss" would go on holidays and leave me in control of the office, and it was part of my "job" to go to his house and feed his pets. For 8 months full time work I received approximately $4,000. He never let me sign an employment contract and told me I was an independent contractor, but I was still required to act like an employee. It was so bad that I left after 8 months, knowing that I was effectively short-changed ~$8000. I would have been making more money if I was on the dole. It was an absolutely devastating experience, and he continues to get away with it, and practice as a lawyer. This is a profession where even to join one must be a "fit and proper person" and yet people can exploit junior practitioners looking to get a foot in the door. The office was secluded and unsecured. The boss would leave me for extended periods of time. The building would not have been compliant with health and safety regulations. I was not covered by work cover, so in the event of an accident I would not have been insured. I didn't accrue leave or sick leave. I was told in no uncertain terms I could not have sick days because I needed to come to work - and that I may as well work when I'm sick because there is nothing better to do. The receptionist came in with migraines and gastro, I came in with the flu. I could take days off as "leave" if required, but I had to give notice well in advance. Income was sporadic. On one occasion I earned about $1000 for work I did. On one other occasion it was about $800. Every other time was usually between $70 and $300. My "boss" was totally in control of my income. My parents gave me money because I couldn't afford petrol to drive to and from work. I was on less money than if I was on the dole. I contacted Centrelink and was told that there was nothing they could do about it. I was down to my last pennies. It was the worst time of my life. This happened at Moorehead Lawyers, Portsea, when I was employed by Michael Moorehead. This happened in the Law industry. There should be criminal penalties for this sort of exploitation. 'Employees' in these sorts of arrangements need to be protected as an employee by fair work, and taken seriously, rather than slip through the cracks because they don't fit the mould. It's akin to slavery. In professional services, such as law, practitioners engaging in this conduct should be stripped of their practicing certificates and prevented from working in the industry.


Michael (received via YWC)

Contracting with an ABN but to one employer only

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: false

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Improve Centrelink so young people aren't forced to take these horrible, horrible jobs

Story

I was contracting with an ABN but to one employer only in my current job. They won't pay me until I reach a certain pay threshold, which means they could be sitting on my $200 for three to four weeks if I don't get any work. They can send me an email at 5pm saying "this has to be done by tomorrow morning" and I just have to drop anything to do the work because I don't get enough hours. I get so little hours I'm still technically unemployed and collecting Newstart, so dealing with Centrelink and an uncertain amount of work hours per week leaves me extremely vulnerable if there's a problem with one or the other. I don't think there's much room to move up in the company, and even if I could the company is based overseas. Here's an idea, improve Centrelink so young people aren't forced to take these horrible, horrible jobs. When government assistance isn't enough to rent a one bedroom apartment anywhere within an hour and a half of the city, young people will take any job they can get because it's better than the alternative.


Anonymous (received via YWC)

Advertising
contracting with an ABN but to one employer only

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: false

Worksafe: false

Childcare: true

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: false

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Nothing. I was able to negotiate an extremely good pay. More regulation will destroy this for me.

Story

I was contracting with an ABN but to one employer only in my current job. I don't have a problem with pay/employment, I just question the legality of not being paid super, tax etc. I do feel that I have less of a say in HR problems though - for example one employee puts the global aircon on a very chilly 17 which is quite uncomfortable - I don't feel I can approach anyone about this. I know zero about work cover. I work in advertising - no matter what kind of employee you are - you are expected to work late and often on weekends. I have an open ended contract - I have no idea when I will be asked to leave. This happened in the Advertising industry. I don't want to change anything. I was able to negotiate an extremely good pay. More regulation will kill my leverage.


Kathryn, Yea (received via YWC)

Education
on a rolling contract @ Department of Education

Pay and Conditions

Health and Safety

Personal Impact

Financial Security

Paid Fair: true

Safe work: true

Predictable Roster: false

Bills ok: true

Legal Employment: true

Worksafe: true

Childcare: false

Accommodation ok: true

Could speak up: true

Could speak up: true

Leave: true

Future secure: false

Solution

Make changes to the way contracts are offered to teachers. The stress it causes to have to reapply for your position, as well as having no job security is difficult. Teachers are forced to write reports and take on extra work at the end of the year and added to their stress is having to apply for work.

Story

I was on a rolling contract in my current job. I feel stress and anxiety about having to reapply and interview to continue in my current role. I feel undervalued by the process and am very concerned about not having secure work as I am a single parent. This happened at Department of Education, Yea. This happened in the Education industry. Make changes to the way contracts are offered to teachers. The stress it causes to have to reapply for your position, as well as having no job security is difficult. Teachers are forced to write reports and take on extra work at the end of the year and added to their stress is having to apply for work.

Page last updated: 20 July 2016